This means a CEO or founder has tremendous power regarding culture.

They are the only person who can:

  • Fire anyone

  • Hire anyone

  • Decide how/why people are rewarded

  • Decide how/why people are punished

And with those 4 powers, every CEO is in fact a Chief Cultural Officer. The terrifying thing is it’s the CEO’s actual behavior, not their speeches or the list of values they have put up on posters, that defines what the culture is. Without these four powers any employee at the company is along for the ride in a culture driven by someone more powerful than they are. By the time the first handful of employees are hired, the culture already exists whether anyone realizes it or not. The people with the most power to fuck up the culture are simply the ones with the most power.

And of course the most vocal challengers to most cultures are the first to be shown the door. It’s in human nature to want to eliminate the most disruptive people. And it’s also human nature to want to bring in more people that fit in well. Repeat these two behaviors over time and culture becomes homogeny, even if everyone still believes the culture values diversity. Is the culture still the same at that point? Everyone still there might believe so, but the people who left because of the culture don’t get asked their opinion.

fastcompany:

In a bid sure to lure binge watchers of quality programs like The Sopranos and The Wire, a new deal will bring HBO series to Amazon Prime streaming and Fire TV.

Read More>

Well, what do you know. Maybe I’ll be watching my first HBO show soon.

(I’ve always refused to pay for premium channels in the hopes that maybe I’d like one or two shows. That’s what, $150 a year per channel? Crazy pants.)

fastcompany:

In an attempt to set the tone for a new, restructured, and a hopefully one day resurrected Fab, CEO Jason Goldberg has sent around a memo that is less rally-the-troops and more “you’re lucky to be here.” Titled “It’s a fucking startup. Why are you here?" the note, also posted on his personal website, continues to remind his employees that they could, very realistically, lose their jobs.

Read More>

Um.

“We believe communities aren’t complete unless you have a blend of proactive and reactive tactics with online and offline components. This is your best chance to reach as many people as you can and offer value to different types of users. Find the right balance of activities for your brand, product and customer/user base to unlock its full potential.”
“Ever notice how families or tribes don’t require much process? That is because there is such a strong trust and culture that it supersedes any process. In organizations (or even in a society) where culture is weak, you need an abundance of heavy, precise rules and processes.”
— Brian Chesky, from Don’t Fuck Up the Culture

fastcompany:

"Person With The Twitter Password," And Other Brutally Honest Versions of Your Job Title

The jokesters at Someecards have created a series of brutally honest job titles to restore order to a world gone mad with euphemism. Each entry stares deep into the soul of a modern job title and reduces it down to the main task for which its bearer is responsible.

Read More>

parislemon:

lohanthony:

predictively:

tactictaco:

pointmybodyouttosea:

i can watch this for hours

fuck you and your steady hand :’(

sorry for the porn

this is so soothing

Pretty much the exact opposite of my handwriting.

O_o

parislemon:

lohanthony:

predictively:

tactictaco:

pointmybodyouttosea:

i can watch this for hours

fuck you and your steady hand :’(

sorry for the porn

this is so soothing

Pretty much the exact opposite of my handwriting.

O_o

parislemon:

digg:

A statistical analysis of Bob Ross paintings. (via FiveThirtyEight)

Strong showing by Cumulus clouds.

Mountains and waterfalls with a much lower showing than I expected.

jakefu:

Google “duck penis” if you’re confused.

Interesting read (Lagunitas!), but the key stat I’d like to know is what dent all craft beer sales combined have made in total domestic sales.